That Big New Thing We Bought

two chairs with glass table on living room near window

So, after pledging to buy nothing new, cut our spending and push on with our greener lifestyle Mr T and I blew the whole thing out of the water! We bought a new house – not just any old house, a brand new, fresh out of the earth new build. Probably one of the least green things we’ve ever done.

So, onwards and upwards…

On the positive side, it’s super insulated and has PV panels on the roof to generate electricity. On the down side, I don’t even want to think about the cement, the carbon footprint of a new build and the loss of green space and wildlife habitat! But, we’re here now and rather than dwell on the negatives Mr T and I are determined to make the most of our new life “back home” in Cumbria.

Buying new allowed us to upsize our living space, downsize our garden and offer a house that will be relatively maintenance free as we approach retirement. We bought all our old furniture with us and we haven’t really  bought anything new to fill it yet (please don’t judge us for the new toilet roll holder – that seemed like a pretty essential piece of equipment after a few nights fumbling in the dark!) Freshly painted, we’ve no plans to decorate. I do have plans though and ultimately the bright white walls will morph into something bolder and more cheerful (my fantasy for a raspberry pink paint in the main bathroom may take some time – Mr T thinks that might be a bit “bold” for his taste.

The few DIY jobs we have undertaken so far have been minor. We’ve hung pictures in most rooms and shelves in the utility room. The shelves have been a bit of a “win:win”. Mr T bought lots of old pine shelving with him from the old house. Freshened up with a dark wood stain and a coat of clear varnish they look like new and do a great job of hiding all the household essentials above my eye level!

Our main focus this year will be the garden and I’m quite desperate to transform the large expanse of grass into something more productive, I’ve been saving yoghurt pots and egg boxes to plant seeds and I’m thankful the removal men didn’t raise an eyebrow at the the bags of home made compost that came with us!

I miss my greenhouse. But the plan to utilise all the window sills as temporary growing spaces is a success – not only do I have green shoots appearing – but Mr T is also very fed up of the motley collection of seed containers of every window sill that plans to invest in a green house have moved a lot higher up his priority list (the plan is to source one secnd hand once the weather improves).

We have been here two months now, which goes some way towards explaining the long silence here. Thanks for sticking with me, and as we move closer to spring and the weather warms up I have no doubts I’ll feel more inclined to post regular updates about our new life and adventure – I can’t wait to introduce you to some of the “treasures” we’ve already discovered – refillable red wine, a wonderful fish seller, a great plastic free shop and some very inspiring garden visits!

Take care of yourselves lovely readers – see you again soon xxx

Photo by Vecislavas Popa

Nature Nurtures Me

nurtured by nature.jpgWhen I was a child, my dad would often disappear for walks. occasionally he’d take us with him, point out grebes swimming on the river, name the trees and the wild flowers or explain why we shouldn’t pick the hogweed*. Mostly he walked in silence, and it’s only now I’m a grown up that I understand his need to be outdoors.

You see, nature nurtures us. In the late 1980’s, I worked in a school in the suburbs of Manchester, it had a stream running through the grounds and some of our more enlightened staff knew that making sure our “troubled children” had access to that space, to “dip” in the pond, discover pond skaters, damselflies and grubs made life easier in the classroom. Those kids were calmer, more able to sit and listen. As teachers, we noticed a difference too, we talked about “clearing away the cobwebs” or how lovely it was to breather fresh air. Truth be told, we dragged those kids outside as much for our own well being as theirs! Thirty years ago it wasn’t called “Forest School” or the “outdoor classroom”, it was just informal access to nature  and we knew the benefits without mountains of research papers to tell us why access to the outdoors mattered. Everyone looked forward to dry days when we could step outside and weave an appreciation of nature into the curriculum – and if you are sceptical of the effect of nature on mood and behaviour, visit any school playground on a windy day and take note of how it affects the children – our dinner ladies* used to  dread windy lunch times!

on the rocks

Whilst we were encouraging those kids to spend time outside, feel the sun on their backs and the wind in their faces, the recognition that being outdoors could improve well being was being accepted across the world. In Japan, the concept known as  “Shinrin – Yoku” (sometimes called “forest bathing” )was gathering momentum. The healing power of being outdoors was accepted as a legitimate course of treatment. Even the NHS implemented changes to hospital design and organisation after published research that showed patients with beds near the window healed faster and went home sooner! (Roger Ulrich‘s research was first published in 1984 and was considered ground breaking at the time).*

Of course, now the media have embraced this concept as “new” and innovative and now we all read constantly that being outdoors is good for the soul as this piece in the Guardian shows, Author and nature lover Emma Mitchell has embraced the idea of being outdoors as a strategy to ensure her mental well being . If you’re interested, then the nature Fix by Florence Williams is definitely worth a read. It’s a fascinating account and exploration of the healing possibilities of nature.

Even the smallest access to green space ( or just being able to see it through a window) can improve out mental and physical health. Notice how children will press their noses to the window on rainy days, anxious to connect with the outdoors. This need to be in nature is with us from the earliest age. I try to eat my breakfast, or at least gulp a mug of tea in the garden every morning. I think of it as a time to balance myself before the onslaught of social media, emails and deadlines. Even better, if I can squeeze in a walk in the forest or through the woods I know my day will be calmer and more productive.  If you’re interested in reading more about this, then I thoroughly recommend  this article in Business Insider, which lists “12 science backed reasons why spending more time outside is healthy“.

Garden Robin

Spending time outdoors has allowed me to observe nature close up, my photographs of birds, butterflies and garden wildlife are a happy accident of time spent sitting, walking or watching. I know that my mental and physical health improves when I get outside, I notice less pain and inflammation in my joints and I often discover the solution to a problem or difficulty. We need access to sunlight to manufacture vitamin D, so clearly the need to be within nature is built into our DNA?

There still needs to be more willingness to accept the existing evidence that nature heals, and to continue to research the best and most effective ways we can use what we already know. Children cooped up in classrooms, prisoners on almost 24 hour a day “lock down”, patients denied access to the outdoors because health care providers prefer to keep them in their beds “where we can see you” and office workers who lunch at their desks because stepping outside the office is no longer the norm. Everyone can benefit from a change in attitude and policy.

It’s hard to ignore the evidence. Nature nurtures, sustains, revives and inspires us. We should all spend more time outside, every day.

 

*The sap is irritating and can cause a nasty rash – leave it alone!

*During my time as a student Nurse, Ulrich’s research was causing a stir. A new hospital wing was designed around a courtyard, so patients could not only see the gardens, but walk in them through patio doors

*dinner ladies / lunch time supervisors

 

Gardener’s Hand Salve

My hands work hard, and I like to pamper them. Not with manicures and glossy polish, but a home made salve that soothes and leaves them soft. It’s easy to make, even in the smallest of kitchens and the ingredients are easily sourced. If you don’t have a decent herbal supplier nearby then you can order online from Neals Yard.  I first shared this recipe way back in 2009 and I’m still making it.

One of these days I’ll take a fresh set of photos, these are awful! Thanks to the” instagram generation”, we all expect beautifully styled images, artfully arranged to tell a story and inspire us to roll up our sleeves and emulate our favourite posts. Me, I still snap away on my smart phone and rarely think about composition! So yes, these photos look “clunky”, old fashioned and maybe even a little out of focus, but they’re honest and they’re mine – not “borrowed” from pinterest or shamelessly retouched in picasa!!

To see the real beauty of this salve, make a batch for yourself. Even buying all the ingredients from scratch will probably cost you less than a tube of organic or fancy pants hand cream and you’ll be able to impress all your friends with home made gifts (yes, I still give this at Christmas). You can buy small jars, but I like to rinse and re-use face cream jars or even those tiny little tins you buy mints in. Be resourceful, use your imagination and have fun in your kitchen! I’ve always “pottered about” with home made cosmetics, making face masks with fruit or egg white, concocting lip balm coloured with beetroot (not a great success, pink hands, pink worktop) and I like the idea that what I put on my skin is as natural as what I eat. It’s a lot easier to find organic, “natural” cosmetics these days, but it still pays to read your labels carefully.

Chamomile hand salve:
Ingredients: 50g dried chamomile flowers, 150ml olive oil, 1tablespoon chopped of beeswax, 10 drops of wheatgerm oil, 5 drops of benzoin tincture, 10 drops of chamomile essential oil. A bain marie or double boiler*, 2 small, sterilised glass jars.
method:
Put the chamomile flowers and the olive oil in a bowl over a pan of simmering water (or use a bain marie if you have one), warm gently for 30 minutes.

Meanwhile, grate or chop the wax. Strain the chamomile and oil mixture and return the infused oil to the bain marie, add the beeswax and stir until it has melted. Remove from the heat. Add the wheatgerm oil and benzoin tincture and stir gently. Pour the liquid into the glass jars, add 5 drops of chamomile oil to each jar and stir gently with a cocktail stick.

Leave to cool completely before sealing the jars.
You can use a different essential oil if you like, but chamomile is gentle and soothing.

This salve can seem a little hard at first, so warm it, by rubbing gently between your fingers before massaging into your hands (or, even the rough skin on your feet, it’s bliss after a day’s sight seeing).

NOTE:Certain essential oils are not recommended if you have a medical condition, are pregnant or breast feeding, always take advice before using, if in doubt leave them out!

*Just a bowl over a pan of simmering water – just like you would melt chocolate.

 

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